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Five Fun Ways To Use Plants in Your Fiction

Five Fun Ways to use in your fiction

Maybe it’s all the green from St. Patrick’s Day yesterday, or maybe I’m just tired of being in the frozen North where green things don’t really show up until mid-April, but today, plants are taking over the blog. Consider this one of those world-building/plotting mash-ups to give you a fresh perspective as you take on your weekend!

Note: this is slightly ironic because, despite two years of teaching basic botany, my personal plant-caring skills are less than awesome. However, I love finding ways to use plants in stories. At least they’ll thrive somewhere! [...]  read more

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Why Your Writing Matters (Even If You’re Not Famous)

Once, there was a teenage girl who wrote for hours a day, yet knew she would never be a writer. Writing was for dreamers who couldn’t pay off their student loans and sat around all day in fantasy worlds. No, this girl had her head on straight and was going into a solid science or medical field. Even though she failed at math and spent her classes pondering plot holes and new content writing. She could come down to earth, put language arts aside, and make the sensible choice.

Considering that I’ve now been writing, coaching, teaching, and editing English for over a decade, we can see how well that turned out. ūüėČ [...]  read more

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6 Fundamental Questions to Refine First Draft World-Building

You’ve now finished your first draft–or you’re getting pretty close to it! Or maybe you’re right in the middle, deep in the trenches, excited that you finished NaNoWriMo or hit your personal deadlines, but with no idea that after fifty thousand words the novel would¬†just. Keep. GOING. WHEN WILL IT EVER BE DONE?

In any case, it’s a great time to relax, sit back, and do a world-building integration check-up. This can be a welcome break from the daily word count grind and a fun way to celebrate your awesome creativity. All the while, you’ll figure out how to use elements like setting, superpowers, and space ships to make your story stand out from the crowd. [...]  read more

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3 Easy Tips to Use Dialect in Writing and World-Building

When you bring up world-building, one of the first things that comes up is language. People ask if you’ve made up your own language, or if you’re going to, or how you should do it.

Now, if you want to make up languages, go ahead! I’m not stopping you. There’s a lot of fun to be had in the world of phonemes, morphemes, etc. ¬†However, if you want to focus more on getting words onto paper, I’d suggest a different route.

Use dialects.

The different between a language and a dialect can be subjective. [...]  read more

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5 Essential Tips For World-Building

5 Essential World-Building Tips

1.) Worldbuilding must serve the story or it’s only window-dressing.

I love world-building. That’s one reason I wrote a textbook and workbook about it. But if the world-building has no connection to the story, then why bother? Use the cool things you make up to create issues and conflict in your plot.

Make sure your world-building impacts the plot. Doing so will automatically elevate your story and grab reader attention.

Now, I understand that in epic fantasy worlds, creating a vast landscape of shiny things for the reader to dive into is part and parcel. But even then, epic fantasy readers have limits on just how much insanely technical or detailed content they’re going to ingest before they’re ready for it to effect the plot in a meaningful way, whether on a small or large scale. If you have a dragon, at the very least have it attack your hero or have it get a broken leg or something when your hero is riding it (preferably at the most inconvenient time).

2.) Figure out the following major categories for societies: gender, birth, family, marriage, death.

The anthropologist side of me is coming at you now. These five categories highlight key aspects of culture and society. Figuring out these areas will automatically nail down your race in highly usable ways. These five categories are especially important for human or humanoid races. However, I would suggest you subject even your less-humanoid races to this analysis.

Why?

First of all, it will help you to make key decisions about how to make your non-humanoid race different from everyday norms.

Second, it will keep you from making your non-humanoid race¬†too¬†inhuman. Is there such a thing in speculative fiction? Yes, if you want to relate to readers and sell books. Even in Lelia Rose Foreman’s Shatterworld, her race of exceptionally odd aliens still show a protectiveness towards their young–a family trait that humans also have. Thus, even though this race has tentacles and other weird things, the reader will still ultimately find a bond of commonality and a reason to cheer for them. Conversely, if you want to make a disposable, blaster-target-practice inhuman race? Make them as different from humans as possible in really odd or repulsive ways.

3.) Always look for contrasts between the worldbuilding and the protagonist’s goals.

 Yay for contrasts!

This tip connects to Tip #1¬†about making the world-building impact the story. In Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games, the Hunger Games themselves are a key part of the dystopian world-building. Collins uses the selection of Primrose Everdeen at the reaping to push Katniss into the Hunger Games out of protective instinct. Then, within the games Katniss ends up making choices that directly conflict with the official purpose of the games. Her goals, to survive and to preserve the life of someone who reminds her of Prim, conflicts with the bloodthirsty spectacle of the games. The fascinating thing about Katniss is she is largely reactive through nearly all of the story, yet Collins still manages to push her buttons so that she develops into this contrasting character. Imagine what you could do with a character who is intentionally bucking the system!

4.) Make sure to have fun – put in quirky things like favorite foods, odd body modifications, or flaming unicorns as everyday transportation.

¬†As long as you keep this aligned with Tip #1, feel free to go ahead and stamp your personality all over your world. This is speculative fiction. We can make up all kinds of crazy things and, as long as we execute it well, readers will eat up our stories. Own your favorite things and own what is unique about you. Don’t be afraid to pull inspiration from your own history, passions, and experiences. The authenticity will bleed out onto the page and make your stories that much more compelling.

For instance, I like ice cream…and frozen custard…and whipped cream…and pretty much any kind of dairy-based frozen dessert. Does this show up in my stories? You bet. In fact, I may or may not have written a web comic where the main character partly sets off the whole adventure based upon an argument over a fair price for a certain flavor ($35 is NEVER an acceptable price for ice cream, by the way). And flaming ice cream is the least of the weird flavors I’ve come up with–did I mention I also like things set on fire?

5.) Everyone believes something – know your culture’s worldview. [...]  read more

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